Garter Chevron Blanket – halfway catchup!

I was looking through some photos from the last two weeks, and realized that I DO have new photos of my garter chevron blanket to share, even though I’m still on knitting hiatus, for now, while my wrists and forearms heal up from overuse.

I actually made a bunch of progress on this project in a short span of time — which is part of how I messed up my stupid wrists in the first place! I had a couple of days in a row where I had to spent 5+ hours sitting quietly, waiting for things. PERFECT for knitting, right? Except, it’s not a good idea to knit garter stitch (knit knit knit knit with no purls or other stitches) for the whole 5 hours with no breaks.

Clover Leaf!

Although I regret it now, because it’s meant such a dumb hiatus, I did get quite a lot knit.

Clover Leaf!

I finished the third colour/second stripe! This was the first really truly green stripe, in a colourway called “granny smith.” I’m still really loving how this is coming out – I know the colours wouldn’t be for everyone, but they’re very me :)

Clover Leaf!

This next stripe is the only non-Cascade yarn. This 3rd stripe/4th colour is Classic Wool from Patons, in a bright medium green called “clover leaf”. Why different yarn? For the most practical reason ever: this yarn in this colour happened to be on super sale at my LYS. It fit into the colour scheme was economical to boot!

Clover Leaf!

I’m super excited about how this blanket is shaping up! I think I’m firmly in “knitted blanket junkie” territory, now.

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Something finished, something new.

Something finished!

I finished both of the Magic Mirror mittens, made from 100% angora yarn that I picked up at Maiwa on Granville Island a couple of years ago. I gave them a quick wash and then let them air dry, to help even out the cables.

Here's to warm hands!

They’re lovely and soft and if it’s still cold here this winter I will wear them! Pretty and girly and not very practical :)

Something new!

Because my other in-progress projects are either a. long term (the Six’es blanket – I now have 66/189 hexagons complete), b. SO CLOSE to being finished I can taste it (the Shepherd hoodie!), or c. lace that means I need to pay attention (I haven’t shown you the lace yet!), I started something new.

Because I have a slim budget at the moment, and because I have plenty of very nice yarn already, I’ve been choosing new projects the last few months by searching through my yarn closet until I feel excited. (Okay there’s other stuff in the closet besides yarn… I just mostly care about the yarn.) Sometimes it’s texture that grabs me, or wanting a particular finished garment, but usually it’s colour.

When I opened the closet, I saw this gorgeous yellow mohair I’ve had for a while (also acquired on Granville Island, but at a different store!) I still haven’t really decided on the perfect pattern for it, despite thorough Ravel-diving.

Sunny mohair

I also noticed these yarns together:

Happy colours

SO PRETTY! I imagined a tubular cowl with narrow stripes in all of these colours and got REALLY excited. On closer examination, I remembered that the white and yellow are heavier weight than the other colours (they’re sport weight, and the rest is sock weight); swatching confirmed that they will not all play nicely together after all.

The white and yellow, however, are both the exact same yarn, and it was the happy sunny yellow that most caught my imagination. This yarn is squishy and bouncy, an 80% merino, 20% bamboo blend with lots of energy and twist.

Stripe time

So, instead of the rainbowey stripey concoction I imagined, I cast on a tubular, striped, chevron cowl in white and yellow. I’m adapting from this pattern.

Chevron stripes!

The dark blue is a provisional cast on – I’ll unravel it, at the end, so that I can graft the two live ends together and make everything seamless and fancy!

Chevron stripes!

It’s good to have this project on the needles. Easily memorized pattern, good for working on while watching tv or listening to vlogs & podcasts, shortish rows, bright happy colours. What are you working on?

Garter Stripe Blanket – Finished!!!

When I last posted about my spectrumey, garter stripe blanket project, it was nearly done – I had finished all the coloured stripes, and I had finished the natural cream wool garter border. Since then, I’ve added a gray i-cord edging, woven in all the ends, and taken a few ton of glamour shots!

First, some details about the i-cord edging. I’m kind of an i-cord fanatic. It’s so simple, but it look so professional and tidy! I certainly could have called the blanket “finished” after the natural garter borders, but I’m thrilled with how the i-cord edge looks.

I love the Purlbee’s attached i-cord tutorial, here. For this blanket, I used a 3 stitch i-cord edge. Whenever the item I’m adding i-cord to is round, I cast on provisionally (I like this crochet cast on), so that when I get back to where I started, I can undo the provisional cast on and graft the two ends together. Be careful – grafting top to bottom a little bit tricker than normal kitchener stitch. The best visualization I’ve seen is on a fellow Raveler’s project page: check it out here!

So! I worked the 3 stitch i-cord edging all around the blanket, skipping an edge stitch every inch and a half or so in order not to stretch out the garter stitch and keep everything nice and tidy. I used Briggs & Little Heritage yarn in medium gray, leftover from an Owls sweater I made a few years ago.

One or two other specs, in case you’d like to make something like this: I cast on as many stitches as would fit on my longest circular needle (174, it turns out). I knit 20 rows/10 ridges in garter stitch per colour, x 10 colours, for 20 coloured stripes. Then I picked up along the long edges of the blanket (200 stitches per side: 1 stitch in each garter ridge), and worked 20 rows/10 ridges in cream yarn. On the short edges, I worked the same 20 rows of garter in cream (I left the coloured stitches live, and picked up 10 stitches from each top edge of the cream borders from the long side). Finally, I added the i-cord.

Without further ado, behold! A TON OF PHOTOS!

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My cat, Miss New Zealand, *really* wants the blanket to be hers. Any time I lay it out, she climbs on and settles in immediately.

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Once I wrestled it away from her adorable napping self, I took the blanket outside for a little photoshoot! I definitely plan to enjoy more cups of tea on my balcony with the blanket.

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I think it works inside, too!

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Guess who popped over for blanket time?

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Lastly, a few shots of the wrong side of the fabric – for full disclosure!

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I think I’ve come a very long way from the very first blanket I ever knit, which I pulled out of the closet this week. I made this old blanket in stages, in 2003-2004. I knit big, garter stitch squares on straight needles, and then seamed them (very, very badly) together. The yarn is this crazy, neon, bouclé stuff that I really loved back then… (Lion Brand Bouclé Multi, to be precise.) I remember many pleasant evenings working on it, while living in university residence and watching Law & Order with my college friends.

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I’m glad I still have it, first because it’s serviceable and warm (and machine washable!), and because it’s nice to compare it to my most recent blanket project and think about how much I’ve grown as a knitter and a person in the ten years between these two big, soft pieces of knitted fabric.

I find blankets to be such satisfying projects, even if they can take a long time. I’ve already started another one, with a different pattern (and a different yarn weight)! More details about that another day :)